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We are pleased tobring you this great selection of Labrador Retriever posters, photos, and fine art prints. Please enjoy browsing these cool posters of dogs.
 Black Labs • Chocolate Labs • Yellow Labs Labrador Store 

I Wanna Go

I Wanna Go
Ron Burns
Art Print
24 x 18 in
Your Price: $19.99
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Labrador

Labrador
Poster
24 x 36 in
Your Price: $9.99
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Five Labs

Five Labs
Jim Williams
Art Print
24 x 19 in
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Dog About Town

Dog About Town
Ron Burns
Art Print
18 x 24 in
Your Price: $19.99
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Yellow Dog Coffee Co.

Yellow Dog Coffee Co.
Ryan Fowler
Art Print
12 x 12 in
Your Price: $11.99
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Moonrise Black Dog - Labrador Lake

Moonrise Black Dog - Labrador Lake
Ryan Fowler
Art Print
18 x 18 in
Your Price: $16.99
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Two Labrador Wine Dogs

Two Labrador Wine Dogs
Ryan Fowler
Art Print
11 x 14 in
Your Price: $11.99
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Yellow Labrador Retriever and Maple Leaves, Portrait

Yellow Labrador Retriever and Maple Leaves, Portrait
Lynn M. Stone
Photographic Print
24 x 18 in
Your Price: $32.99
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Savvy Labrador

Savvy Labrador
Dean Russo
Art Print
19 x 13 in
Your Price: $19.99
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Labrador Retrievers Play in the Water at Sunset

Labrador Retrievers Play in the Water at Sunset
Roy Toft
Photographic Print
16 x 12 in
Your Price: $59.99
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Girl with Dog

Girl with Dog
Poster
16 x 20 in
Your Price: $14.99
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Never Be Afraid to Say…

Never Be Afraid to Say…"F***k You”
Poster
24 x 36 in
Your Price: $7.99
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Remington Finder's Keepers

Remington Finder's Keepers
Tin Sign
16 x 12 in
Your Price: $14.99
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Puppy Taking Bath

Puppy Taking Bath
Lew Robertson
Photographic Print
24 x 18 in
Your Price: $32.99
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Doggy Family

Doggy Family
Jenn Ski
Art Print
12 x 12 in
Your Price: $14.99
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Four Labrador Retrievers Running Through Poppies in Antelope Valley, California, USA

Four Labrador Retrievers Running Through Poppies in Antelope Valley, California, USA
Zandria Muench Beraldo
Photographic Print
24 x 18 in
Your Price: $32.99
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Ducks Unlimited Waiting at Crow's Creek

Ducks Unlimited Waiting at Crow's Creek
Tin Sign
16 x 12 in
Your Price: $14.99 $12.99
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Mr Stuart's Favourite Hunter, Vagabond and His Flatcoated Retriever, Nell by a Cottage Door

Mr Stuart's Favourite Hunter, Vagabond and His Flatcoated Retriever, Nell by a Cottage Door
Sr, John Ferneley
Art Print
24 x 18 in
Your Price: $29.99
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 Labrador Wallpaper


Labs Desktop

Labrador Wallpaper


Labrador Articles

The Labrador Retriever
By Michael Russell
Retrievers were originally bred as hunting dogs. Their job was to sit by the hunter and wait until game was shot and then retrieve it on command. This often meant swimming through cold water or running through dense brush. Labs were also taught not to damage the game upon returning it to their master.

Causes and Prevention of Diarrhea In Labrador Retrievers
By Richard Cussons
A healthy Labrador Retriever will normally defecate firm stools once or twice a day. However, if your Labrador Retriever passes semi-solid or liquid stools more often than usual, then he is probably suffering from canine diarrhea. Diarrhea is common in Labrador Retrievers because of their hearty appetites.

Labrador Retriever Basics
By Hans Lynch
The Labrador Retriever is one of several kinds of retriever. Although somewhat boisterous if untrained, they are exceptionally affable, gentle, intelligent, energetic and good natured, both as companion and working dog. With training, the Lab is one of the most dependable, obedient and multi-talented breeds in the world.

Bloat - It Could Kill Your Labrador Retriever
By Richard Cussons
The Labrador Retriever is one of the breeds at risk of bloat.

Dog Toys - Does Your Labrador Retriever Need Them?
By Richard Cussons
 

Labrador Retriever Puppies for Adoption
By Anna Hart
Labrador Retriever puppies for adoption are often purebred, and every bit as wonderful, loving, and energetic as a puppy you would buy.

How To Remove The Urine Stain Of Your Labrador Retriever
By Richard Cussons

Black Labrador Retriever - Silver Factored or Mongrel?
By Anna Hart
Suppose you have silvery hair. The natural assumption of those with whom you live and work would be that you are of an age when the hair begins to lose its color. If your hair turned grey before you were 20 or 30 years of age, it might be a dietary deficiency, a medical concern – or genetics.

Black Labrador Retriever Color - What Is the Standard?
By Anna Hart
There you were, walking innocently through the mall, when you decide to go into the pet shop. Actually, your children make the decision, clamoring to get a puppy.

Finding Cool And Unique Labrador Retriever Names
By Richard Livitski

How To Train Labrador Retriever Puppies
By Darren Lintern

Make The Labrador Retriever Part Of Your Family And You'll Have A Loyal Pet
By Lee Dobbins

How Do I Train My Labrador Retriever To Not Pull When Walking Her On A Leash?
By Dennis Watson

Think Labrador Retrievers When Looking For Good Family Dogs
By Richard Livitski

The Bloody Nose Of Your Labrador Retriever
By Richard Cussons

Rabies In A Labrador Retriever
By Richard Cussons

Can Parvovirus Affect Labrador Retriever?
By Richard Cussons

Plane Ride With Labrador Retriever
By Richard Cussons

Are You Ready To Adopt A Labrador Retriever?
By Richard Cussons

Tips On Bathing Your Labrador Retriever
By Richard Cussons

Trimming The Nails Of Your Labrador Retriever
By Richard Cussons

Labrador Facts and Information
The Labrador Retriever (also Labrador, Labby or Lab for short), is one of several kinds of retriever, a type of gun dog. The Labrador is considered the most popular breed of dog (by registered ownership) in the world, and is by a large margin the most popular breed by registration in the United States (since 1991) the United Kingdom, Poland, and several other countries. It is also the most popular breed of assistance dog in the United States, Australia, and many other countries, as well as being widely used by police and other official bodies for their detection and working abilities. They are exceptionally affable, gentle, intelligent, energetic and good natured, making them both excellent companions and working dogs. Although somewhat boisterous if untrained, Labrador Retrievers respond well to praise and positive attention, and are considerably "food and fun" oriented. These dogs are as well loyal and great with little children. They may be used in shows. With training, the Lab is one of the most dependable, obedient and multi-talented breeds in the world.

Description

Appearance

Labradors are relatively large, with males typically weighing 30–36 kg (65–80 lb) and females 30–36 kg (65–80 lb) under AKC standards, but some labs do become overweight and may weigh significantly more. Their coats are short and smooth, and they possess a straight, powerful tail often likened to that of an otter. The majority of the characteristics of this breed, with the exception of colour, are the result of breeding to produce a working retriever.

As with some other breeds, the English (typically "show" or "bench") and the American (typically "working" or "field") lines differ. Today, "English" and "American" lines exist in both the United Kingdom and in North America. In general, however, in the United Kingdom, Labs tend to be bred as medium-sized dogs, shorter and stockier with fuller faces and a slightly calmer nature than their American counterparts, which are regionally often bred as taller, lighter-built dogs. These two types are informal and not codified or standardized; no distinction is made by the AKC or other kennel clubs, but the two types come from different breeding lines. Australian stock also exists; though not seen in the west, they are common in Asia. Other "local minor variants" may also exist in some areas.

The breed tends to shed hair twice annually, or regularly throughout the year in temperate climates. Some labs shed a lot, although individuals vary. Lab hair is usually fairly short and straight, and the tail quite broad and strong. The otter-like tail and webbed toes of the Labrador Retriever make them excellent swimmers. Their interwoven coat is also relatively waterproof, providing more assistance for swimming. The tail acts as a rudder for changing direction.

Show standards

Like any animal, there is a great deal of variety among Labs. These characteristics are typical of the show-bred or bench-bred lines of this breed in the United States, and are based on the AKC standard.Significant differences between US and UK standards are noted.

* Size: Labs are a medium-large but compact breed. They should have an appearance of proportionality. They should be as long from the shoulders back as they are from the floor to the withers. Males should stand 22.5-24.5 inch (55.9-62.5 cm) tall at the withers and weigh 65–80 lb (30–36 kg). Females should stand 21.5–23.5 inch (54.5–60 cm) and weigh 55–70 lb (25–32 kg). By comparison under UK Kennel Club standards, height should be 22–22.5 inch (55.9–57.2 cm) for males, and 21.5–22 inch (54.6–55.9 cm) for females.

* Coat: The Lab's coat should be short and dense, but not wiry. The coat is described as 'water-resistant' or more accurately 'water-repellent' so that the dog does not get cold when taking to water in the winter. That means the dog naturally has a slightly dry, oily coat. Acceptable colors are chocolate, black, and yellow. There is much variance within yellow Labs. colors should be solid, though varying shades of yellow on the same dog are acceptable in yellow labs and a white spot on the chest is unacceptable in black labs and is grounds for immediate disqualification, although white socks on the feet are acceptable.

* Head: The head should be broad with a pronounced stop and slightly pronounced brow. The eyes should be kind and expressive. Appropriate eye colors are brown and hazel. The lining around the eyes should be black. The ears should hang close to the head and are set slightly above the eyes.

* Jaws: The jaws should be strong and powerful. The muzzle should be of medium length, and should not be too tapered. The jawls should hang slightly and curve gracefully back.

* Body: The body should be strong and muscular with a level top line.

The tail and coat are designated "distinctive [or distinguishing] features" of the Labrador by both the Kennel Club and AKC.The AKC adds that "true Labrador Retriever temperament is as much a hallmark of the breed as the 'otter' tail."

Color

There are three recognized colors for Labs:black (a solid black colour), yellow (anything from light cream to gold to "fox-red"), and chocolate (medium to dark brown).

Puppies of all colors can potentially occur in the same litter. Colour is determined primarily by two genes. The first gene (the B locus) determines the density of the coat's pigment granules: dense granules result in a black coat, sparse ones give a chocolate coat. The second (E) locus determines whether the pigment is produced at all. A dog with the recessive e allele will produce little pigment and will be yellow regardless of its genotype at the B locus. Variations in numerous other genes control the subtler details of the coat's colouration, which in yellow Labs varies from white to light gold to a fox red. Chocolate and black Labs' noses will match the coat colour.

 Nose and skin pigmentation

Because Lab colouration is controlled by multiple genes, it is possible for recessive genes to emerge some generations later and also there can sometimes be unexpected pigmentation effects to different parts of the body. Pigmentation effects appear in regard to yellow Labs, and sometimes chocolate, and hence the majority of this section covers pigmentation within the yellow Lab. The most common places where pigmentation is visible are the nose, lips, gums, feet,tails, and the rims of the eyes, which may be black, brown, light yellow-brown ("liver", caused by having two genes for chocolate), or several other colours. A Lab can carry genes for a different colour, for example a black Lab can carry recessive chocolate and yellow genes, and a yellow Lab can carry recessive genes for the other two colours. DNA testing can reveal some aspects of these. Less common pigmentations (other than pink) are a fault, not a disqualification, and hence such dogs are still permitted to be shown.

The intensity of black pigment on yellow Labs is controlled by a separate gene independent of the fur colouring.Yellow Labs usually have black noses, which may gradually turn pink with age (called "snow nose" or "winter nose"). This is due to a reduction in the enzyme tyrosinase which indirectly controls the production of melanin, a dark colouring. Tyrosinase is temperature dependent—hence light colouration can be seasonal, due to cold weather—and is less produced with increasing age two years old onwards. As a result, the nose colour of most yellow Labs becomes a somewhat pink shade as they grow older.


A colouration known as "Dudley" is also possible. Dudleys are variously defined as yellow Labs which have no pigmented (pink) noses (LRC), yellow with liver/chocolate pigmentation (AKC), or "flesh coloured" in addition to having the same colour around the rims of the eye, rather than having black or dark brown pigmentation.[11][8] . A yellow Lab with brown or chocolate pigmentation, for example, a brown or chocolate nose, is not necessarily a Dudley, though according to the AKC's current standard it would be if it has chocolate rims around the eyes (or more accurately of the genotype eebb). Breed standards for Labradors considers a true Dudley to be a disqualifying feature for a show Lab, such as one with a thoroughly pink nose or one lacking in any pigment along with flesh coloured rims around the eyes. True Dudley are extremely rare.

Breeding in order to correct pigmentation often lacks dependability. Because colour is determined by many genes, some of which are recessive, crossbreeding a pigmentation non-standard yellow Lab to a black Lab may not correct the matter or prevent future generations carrying the same recessive genes. For similar reasons, crossbreeding chocolate to yellow labs is also often avoided.

Variant lines

Differences in the physical build of the dog have arisen as a result of specialized breeding. Dogs bred for hunting and field-trial work are selected first for working ability, whereas dogs bred to compete for show championships are selected for the characteristics sought by judges in the show ring. There are significant differences between field and trial-bred (sometimes referred to as "American") and show-bred (or "English") lines of Labradors. In general, show-bred Labs are heavier, slightly shorter-bodied, and have a thicker coat and tail. Field Labs are generally longer legged, lighter, and more lithe in build. In the head, show Labs tend to have broader heads, better defined stops, and more powerful necks, while field Labs have lighter and slightly narrower heads with longer muzzles. Field-bred Labs are commonly higher energy and more high-strung compared to the show-bred Lab, and as a consequence may be more suited to working relationships rather than being a "family pet." Of course, each individual dog differs. Some breeders, especially those specializing in the field type, feel that breed shows do not adequately recognize their type of dog. There is also occasional debate regarding officially splitting the breed. In the United States, the AKC and the Labrador's breed club have tried to adjust the standard in the United States to help reflect the field-bred Labrador. Hence show dogs in that country are allowed, for instance, to be larger. In addition many breeders have started producing dual champions, for dogs that excel in the field and in the showring.

Non-variants

Terms such as "golden", "silver", "blue", "white" or "grey" as variants are not recognized. The term "Golden Labrador" has been used both as an incorrect term for yellow labradors of a golden shade, and also for any Labrador-Golden Retriever crossbreed of any colour, including black. White is a light shade of yellow (officially referred to as 'light cream' or 'pale yellow' in the standard), and silver is either not recognized or registered as chocolate (officially registered by the AKC as chocolate labs with variant color). Claims that some "rare" variants exist or have been verified by DNA testing, or the like, are widely considered to be a 'scam'.

 Temperament

Labradors are a well-balanced and versatile breed, adaptable to a wide range of functions as well as making very good pets. As a rule they are not excessively prone to being territorial, pining, insecure, aggressive, destructive, hypersensitive, or other difficult traits which sometimes manifest in a variety of breeds, and as the name suggests, they are excellent retrievers. As an extension of this, they instinctively enjoy holding objects and even hands or arms in their mouths, which they can do with great gentleness (a Labrador can carry an egg in its mouth without breaking it)[22]. They are also known to have a very soft feel to the mouth, as a result of being bred to retrieve game such as waterfowl. They are prone to chewing objects (though they can be trained out of this behavior). The Labrador Retriever's coat repels water to some extent, thus facilitating the extensive use of the dog in waterfowl hunting.
Labs, like other dogs, may often tend to dig like this 3 month old and are generally very friendly with other dogs, like this German Shepherd.

Labradors have a reputation as a very mellow breed and an excellent family dog (including a good reputation with children of all ages and other animals), but some lines (particularly those that have continued to be bred specifically for their skills at working in the field rather than for their appearance) are particularly fast and athletic. Their fun-loving boisterousness and lack of fear may require training and firm handling at times to ensure it does not get out of hand - an uncontrolled adult can be quite problematic. Females may be slightly more independent than males. Labradors mature at around three years of age; before this time they can have a significant degree of puppyish energy, often mislabeled as being hyperactive. Because of their enthusiasm, leash-training early on is suggested to prevent pulling when full-grown.[24] Labs often enjoy retrieving a ball endlessly and other forms of activity (such as agility, frisbee, or flyball). They are considerably "food and fun" oriented, very trainable, and open-minded to new things, and thrive on human attention, affection and interaction, of which they find it difficult to get enough. Reflecting their retrieving bloodlines, almost every Lab loves playing in water or swimming.

Although they will sometimes bark at noise, especially a degree of "alarm barking" when there is noise from unseen sources, Labs are not on the whole noisy or territorial, and are often very easygoing and trusting with strangers, and therefore are not usually suitable as guard dogs.

Labradors have a well-known reputation for appetite, and some individuals may be highly indiscriminate, eating digestible and non-food objects alike. They are persuasive and persistent in requesting food. For this reason, the Lab owner must carefully control his/her dog's food intake to avoid obesity and its associated health problems (see below).

The steady temperament of Labs and their ability to learn make them an ideal breed for search and rescue, detection, and therapy work. Their primary working role in the field continues to be that of a hunting retriever.

Use as working dogs

Labradors are an intelligent breed with a good work ethic and generally good temperaments (breed statistics show that 91.5% of Labradors who were tested passed the American Temperament Test.) Common working roles for Labradors include: hunting, tracking and detection, disabled-assistance, carting, and therapy work. Approximately 60–70% of all guide dogs in the United States are Labradors; other common breeds are Golden Retrievers and German Shepherd Dogs.

The high intelligence, initiative and self-direction of Labradors in working roles is evinced by individuals such as Endal, who during a 2001 emergency is believed to be the first dog to have placed an unconscious human being in the recovery position without prior training, then obtaining the human's mobile phone, "thrusting" it by their ear on the ground, then fetching their blanket, before barking at nearby dwellings for assistance.[28] A number of labradors have also taught themselves to assist their owner in removing money and credit cards from ATMs without prior training.[29]

Health and well-being
Many dogs, including Labs such as this ten year old, show distinct whitening of the coat as they grow older; especially around the muzzle.

Labrador pups should not be brought home before they are 7–10 weeks old. Their life expectancy is generally 12 to 13 years or a few years longer with good medical care[citation needed],[30] and it is a healthy breed with relatively few major problems. Notable issues related to health and wellbeing include:

 Inherited disorders

* Labs are somewhat prone to hip and elbow dysplasia, especially the larger dogs, though not as much as some other breeds. Hip scores are recommended before breeding.
* Labs also suffer from the risk of knee problems. A luxating patella is a common occurrence in the knee where the leg is often bow shaped.
* Eye problems are also possible in some Labs, particularly progressive retinal atrophy, cataracts, corneal dystrophy and retinal dysplasia. Dogs which are intended to be bred should be examined by a veterinary ophthalmologist for an eye score.
* Hereditary myopathy, a rare inherited disorder that causes a deficiency in type II muscle fibre.
* There is a small incidence of other conditions, such as autoimmune diseases and deafness in labs, either congenitally or later in life.

Other disorders

Labs are sometimes prone to ear infection, because their floppy ears trap warm moist air. This is easy to control, but needs regular checking to ensure that a problem is not building up unseen. A healthy Lab ear should look clean and light pink (almost white) inside. Darker pink (or inflamed red), or brownish deposits, are a symptom of ear infection. The usual treatment is regular cleaning daily or twice daily (being careful not to force dirt into the sensitive inner ear) and sometimes medication (ear drops) for major cases. As a preventative measure, some owners clip the hair carefully around the ear and under the flap, to encourage better air flow. Labradors also get cases of allergic reactions to food or other environmental factors.

Obesity

Labs are often overfed and are allowed to become overweight, due to their blatant enjoyment of treats, hearty appetites, and endearing behavior towards people. Lack of activity is also a contributing factor. A healthy Lab should keep a very slight hourglass waist and be fit and light, rather than fat or heavy-set. Excessive weight is strongly implicated as a risk factor in the later development of hip dysplasia or other joint problems and diabetes, and also can contribute to general reduced health when older. Osteoarthritis is commonplace in older, especially overweight, Labs.


 Exploration

Labradors are not especially renowned for escapology. They do not typically jump high fences or dig. Because of their personalities, some Labs climb and/or jump for their own amusement. As a breed they are highly intelligent and capable of intense single-mindedness and focus if motivated or their interest is caught. Therefore, with the right conditions and stimuli, a bored Lab could "turn into an escape artist par excellence".

Labradors as a breed are curious, exploratory and love company, following both people and interesting scents for food, attention and novelty value. In this way, they can often "vanish" or otherwise become separated from their owners with little fanfare. They are also popular dogs if found, and at times may be stolen. Because of this a number of dog clubs and rescue organisations (including the UK's Kennel Club) consider it good practice that Labradors are microchipped, with the owner's name and address also on their collar and tags.

Significant crossbreeds

The "Labradoodle" is a popular "designer dog" that combines a Labrador with a Poodle, to create a hybrid that is more suited to allergy sufferers.

Some assistant-dog groups also like using Golden Retriever / Labrador Retriever hybrids (officially called a Golden Labrador Retriever) in hopes of having dogs with fewer genetic problems. Naturally it is important to use dogs from good stocks since crossbreeds are not immune to such problems and since Golden Retrievers and Labradors have some of the same health problems.

Another significant crossbreed of the Labrador Retriever is the Labradinger, which combines a Labrador with an English Springer Spaniel. This breed is generally smaller and is recognized by the American Canine Hybrid Club

The assistance dog organisation Mira utilises Labrador-Bernese Mountain Dog crosses ("Labernese") with success.


 Demography

Main article: List of most popular dog breeds

The Labrador is an exceptionally popular dog. For example as of 2006:

* Widely considered the most popular breed in the world.
* Most popular dog by ownership in USA (since 1991), UK, Australia, New Zealand and Canada.
* In both the UK and USA, there are well over twice as many Labradors registered as the next most popular breed. If the comparison is limited to dog breeds of a similar size, then there are around 3 - 5 times as many Labradors registered in both countries as the next most popular breeds, the German Shepherd and Golden Retriever.
* Most popular breed of assistance dog in the United States, Australia and many other countries, as well as being widely used by police and other official bodies for their detection and working abilities.[4] Approximately 60–70% of all guide dogs in the United States are Labradors .
* Seven out of 13 of the Australian National Kennel Council "Outstanding Gundogs" Hall of Fame appointees are Labradors (list covers 2000-2005).
 

 
I Wanna Go

I Wanna Go
Ron Burns
Art Print
24 x 18 in
Your Price: $19.99
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Labrador

Labrador
Poster
24 x 36 in
Your Price: $9.99
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Five Labs

Five Labs
Jim Williams
Art Print
24 x 19 in
Your Price: $24.99
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Dog About Town

Dog About Town
Ron Burns
Art Print
18 x 24 in
Your Price: $19.99
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Yellow Dog Coffee Co.

Yellow Dog Coffee Co.
Ryan Fowler
Art Print
12 x 12 in
Your Price: $11.99
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Moonrise Black Dog - Labrador Lake

Moonrise Black Dog - Labrador Lake
Ryan Fowler
Art Print
18 x 18 in
Your Price: $16.99
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Two Labrador Wine Dogs

Two Labrador Wine Dogs
Ryan Fowler
Art Print
11 x 14 in
Your Price: $11.99
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Yellow Labrador Retriever and Maple Leaves, Portrait

Yellow Labrador Retriever and Maple Leaves, Portrait
Lynn M. Stone
Photographic Print
24 x 18 in
Your Price: $32.99
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Savvy Labrador

Savvy Labrador
Dean Russo
Art Print
19 x 13 in
Your Price: $19.99
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Labrador Retrievers Play in the Water at Sunset

Labrador Retrievers Play in the Water at Sunset
Roy Toft
Photographic Print
16 x 12 in
Your Price: $59.99
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Girl with Dog

Girl with Dog
Poster
16 x 20 in
Your Price: $14.99
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Never Be Afraid to Say…

Never Be Afraid to Say…"F***k You”
Poster
24 x 36 in
Your Price: $7.99
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Remington Finder's Keepers

Remington Finder's Keepers
Tin Sign
16 x 12 in
Your Price: $14.99
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Puppy Taking Bath

Puppy Taking Bath
Lew Robertson
Photographic Print
24 x 18 in
Your Price: $32.99
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Doggy Family

Doggy Family
Jenn Ski
Art Print
12 x 12 in
Your Price: $14.99
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Four Labrador Retrievers Running Through Poppies in Antelope Valley, California, USA

Four Labrador Retrievers Running Through Poppies in Antelope Valley, California, USA
Zandria Muench Beraldo
Photographic Print
24 x 18 in
Your Price: $32.99
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Ducks Unlimited Waiting at Crow's Creek

Ducks Unlimited Waiting at Crow's Creek
Tin Sign
16 x 12 in
Your Price: $14.99 $12.99
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Mr Stuart's Favourite Hunter, Vagabond and His Flatcoated Retriever, Nell by a Cottage Door

Mr Stuart's Favourite Hunter, Vagabond and His Flatcoated Retriever, Nell by a Cottage Door
Sr, John Ferneley
Art Print
24 x 18 in
Your Price: $29.99
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