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WWII Posters

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Caramel Klaus

(c. 1930)
Klaus candy has been bringing smiles to the faces of children...


World's Fair, New York, c.1939

This awesome vintage poster features two monumental landmark buildings, the Trylon and Perisphere, which were part of the "Theme Center" of the 1939 World's Fair. The 700-foot Trylon...





Official Coca-Cola website

Vintage Coca Cola Posters, Pictures, and Images

Enjoy browsing this great collection of Vintage Coca Cola posters, photos, and fine art prints. For information about ordering any of these Vintage Coca Cola posters, just click on the link below the image. You can also beautify and protect your prints by having them custom framed.

Coca Cola Bottle Evolution

Coca Cola Bottle Evolution
Tin Sign
16 x 13 in
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Coca-Cola

Coca-Cola
Tin Sign
12 x 12 in
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Coca Cola

Coca Cola
Tin Sign
12 x 12 in
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Ice Cold Coca-Cola

Ice Cold Coca-Cola
Tin Sign
16 x 12 in
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Coca-Cola

Coca-Cola
Tin Sign
16 x 12 in
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Coke – Weathered 1910 Logo

Coke – Weathered 1910 Logo
Tin Sign
16 x 8 in
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A and W Root Beer Soda Metal Round

A and W Root Beer Soda Metal Round
Tin Sign
12 x 12 in
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COKE - Thirst Quenching

COKE - Thirst Quenching
Tin Sign
12 x 12 in
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Hot Dog and Coca Cola

Hot Dog and Coca Cola
Tin Sign
12 x 16 in
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Coca- Cola

Coca- Cola
Tin Sign
16 x 12 in
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Drink Dr. Pepper Soda Good For Life

Drink Dr. Pepper Soda Good For Life
Tin Sign
16 x 8 in
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Coca Cola Coke Bottle

Coca Cola Coke Bottle
Tin Sign
7 x 21 in
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COKE - Delicious 5 Cents

COKE - Delicious 5 Cents
Tin Sign
12 x 16 in
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Coca-Cola

Coca-Cola
Poster
16 x 20 in
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Yes We Are Open

Yes We Are Open
Aurélien Terrible
Art Print
28 x 20 in
Your Price: $49.99
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Pepsi- Cola

Pepsi- Cola
Tin Sign
15 x 12 in
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Pepsi- Cola

Pepsi- Cola
Tin Sign
15 x 12 in
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Coca-Cola

Coca-Cola
Tin Sign
12 x 16 in
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The first Coca-Cola recipe was invented in Columbus, Georgia at a drugstore by John Pemberton, originally as a cocawine called Pemberton's French Wine Coca in 1885. Believe it or not. Cocawine was an alcoholic beverage that combined wine and cocaine.

In 1886, when Atlanta and Fulton County passed prohibition legislation, Pemberton responded by developing Coca-Cola, essentially a non-alcoholic version of French Wine Cola. The original recipe was made without carbonated water, but was added later when Pemberton was mixing the drink for friends without the carbonated water and accidentally added it to a glass. His friends loved it more and he decided to continue making his drink with the carbonated water instead.The first sales were at Jacob's Pharmacy in Atlanta, Georgia, on May 8, 1886. It was initially sold as a patent medicine for five cents a glass at soda fountains, which were popular in the United States at the time due to the belief that carbonated water was good for the health. Pemberton claimed Coca-Cola cured many diseases, including morphine addiction, dyspepsia, neurasthenia, headache, and impotence. Pemberton ran the first advertisement for the beverage on May 29 of the same year in the Atlanta Journal. For the first eight months only nine drinks were sold each day.

Pemberton called for five ounces of coca leaf per gallon of syrup, a significant dose, whereas, in 1891, Candler claimed his formula (altered extensively from Pemberton's original) contained only a tenth of this amount. Coca Cola did once contain an estimated nine milligrams of cocaine per glass, but in 1903 it was removed. Coca Cola still contains coca flavoring.

Kola nuts act as a flavoring in Coca Cola, but are also the beverage's source of caffeine. In Britain, for example, the ingredient label states "Flavourings (Including Caffeine)"

Bottle and logo design

The famous Coca-Cola logo was created by John Pemberton's bookkeeper, Frank Mason Robinson, in 1885. It was Robinson who came up with the name, and he also chose the logos distinctive cursive script. The typeface used, known as Spencerian script, was developed in the mid 19th century and was the dominant form of formal handwriting in the United States during that period.

The equally famous Coca-Cola bottle, called the "contour bottle" within the company, but known to some as the "hobble skirt" bottle, was created in 1915 by bottle designer, Earl R. Dean. In 1915, the Coca-Cola Company launched a competition among its bottle suppliers to create a new bottle for the beverage that would distinguish it from other beverage bottles... "a bottle which a person could recognize even if they felt it in the dark, and so shaped that, even if broken, a person could tell at a glance what it was".

Advertising

Coke has a 5 Coca-Cola ad in McPherson, Kansas on an old building that has survived many years. Originally, Coke sold them a huge amount of paint so that they would not have to buy any more touch-up paint for a very long time. Coke still has some paint stashed up because they want to be sure that that advertisement never completely wears away.

Coca-Cola's advertising has had a significant impact on American culture, and is frequently credited with the "invention" of the modern image of Santa Claus as an old man in red-and-white garments; however, while the company did in fact start promoting this image in the 1930s in its winter advertising campaigns, it was already common before that. In fact, Coca-Cola was not even the first soft drink company to utilize the modern image Santa Claus in its advertising White Rock Beverages used Santa in advertisements for its ginger ale in 1923 after first using him to sell mineral water in 1915.

Before Santa Claus, however, Coca-Cola relied on images of smartly-dressed young women to sell its beverages. Coca-Cola's first such advertisement appeared in 1895 and featured a young Bostonian actress named Hilda Clark as its spokesperson.

In the 1970s, a song from a Coca-Cola commercial called "I'd Like to Teach the World to Sing", produced by Billy Davis, became a popular hit single.

Coca-Cola has a policy of avoiding using children younger than the age of 12 in any of its advertising. This decision was made as a result of a lawsuit from the beginning of the 20th century that alleged that Coke's caffeine content was dangerous to children. However, in recent times, this has not stopped the company from targeting young consumers.

Coke's advertising is rather pervasive, as one of Woodruff's stated goals was to ensure that everyone on Earth drank Coca-Cola as their preferred beverage. This is especially true in southern areas of the United States, such as Atlanta, where Coke was born.

Some of the memorable Coca-Cola television commercials between 1960 through 1986, were written and produced by former Atlanta radio veteran Don Naylor (WGST 1936-1950, WAGA 1951-1959) during his career as a producer for the McCann Erickson advertising agency. Many of these early television commercials for Coca-Cola featured movie stars, sports heroes, and popular singers of the day.

During the 1980s, Pepsi-Cola ran a series of television advertisements showing people participating in taste tests essentially demonstrating that: "Fifty percent of the participants who said they preferred Coke actually chose the Pepsi". Statisticians were quick to point out the problematic nature of a 50/50 result; that most likely all this really showed was that in blind tests, most people simply cannot tell the difference between Pepsi and Coke. Coca-Cola ran ads to combat Pepsi's ads in an incident sometimes referred to as the cola wars; one of Coke's ads compared the so-called Pepsi challenge to two chimpanzees deciding which tennis ball was furrier. Thereafter, Coca-Cola regained its leadership in the market.

 At the beginning of 1986, however, Coke's marketing team found a strategy by returning to their original motives for changing the drink: the youth market so beholden to Pepsi. Max Headroom, the purportedly computer-generated British media personality played by Matt Frewer, was chosen to replace Cosby as the spokesman (of sorts) for Coke's new "Catch the Wave" campaign.

Selena was a spokesperson for Coca-Cola from 1989 till the time of her death. She filmed three commercials for the company. In 1994 to commemorate her 5 years with the company, Coca-Cola issued special Selena coke bottles.

In an attempt to broaden its portfolio, Coca-Cola purchased Columbia Pictures in 1982. Columbia provided subtle publicity through Coke product placements in many of its films while under Coke's ownership. However, after a few early successes, Columbia began to under-perform, and was dropped by the company in 1989.

Coca-Cola has gone through a number of different advertising slogans in its long history, including "The pause that refreshes", "I'd like to buy the world a Coke", and "Coke is it" (see Coca-Cola slogans).

In 2006, Coca-Cola introduced My Coke Rewards, a customer loyalty campaign where consumers earn virtual "points" by entering codes from special marked packages of Coca-Cola products into a website. These points can in turn be redeemed for various prizes or sweepstakes entries.

Santa Claus
Images of Santa Claus were popularized through Haddon Sundblom's depiction of him for The Coca-Cola Company's Christmas advertising in the 1930s. The popularity of the image spawned urban legends that Santa Claus was in fact invented by Coca-Cola or that Santa wears red and white because those are the Coca-Cola colors. In reality, Coca-Cola was not even the first soft drink company to utilize the modern image Santa Claus in its advertising White Rock Beverages used Santa to sell mineral water in 1915 and then in advertisements for its ginger ale in 1923. Furthermore, the massive campaign by Coca-Cola simply popularised the depiction of Santa as wearing red and white, in contrast to the variety of colours he wore prior to that campaign; red and white was originally given by Nast.

1980's New Coke
New Coke was the unofficial name of the sweeter formulation introduced in 1985 by The Coca-Cola Company to replace its flagship soft drink, Coca-Cola (a.k.a. Coke). Properly speaking, New Coke had no separate name of its own, but was simply known as "the new taste of Coca-Cola" until 1992 when it was renamed Coca-Cola II.

Coca-Cola formula - Published competitors say it contains sugar, caramel, caffeine, phosphoric acid, coca leaf and kola nut extract, lime extract, flavoring mixture, vanilla and glycerin. Alleged syrup recipes vary greatly, and Coca-Cola reluctantly admits the formula has changed over the decades.

Coca- Cola

Coca- Cola
Tin Sign
12 x 16 in
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Coca Cola Logo

Coca Cola Logo
Poster
36 x 24 in
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Coca Cola Star & Stripes Art

Coca Cola Star & Stripes Art
Poster
24 x 36 in
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Mountain Dew Soda 15 Cents

Mountain Dew Soda 15 Cents
Tin Sign
12 x 17 in
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Coca Cola Coke Santa Claus Christmas

Coca Cola Coke Santa Claus Christmas
Tin Sign
12 x 16 in
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Coca-Cola

Coca-Cola
Poster
36 x 12 in
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Coke Victorian Red

Coke Victorian Red
Tin Sign
12 x 16 in
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Cold Cola

Cold Cola
Tin Sign
20 x 6 in
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7Up Seven Up Soda Fresh Up You'll Like It Round

7Up Seven Up Soda Fresh Up You'll Like It Round
Tin Sign
12 x 12 in
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Coca-Cola

Coca-Cola
Poster
12 x 36 in
Your Price: $17.99
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Coke – Ice Cold Green

Coke – Ice Cold Green
Tin Sign
16 x 12 in
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Coca-Cola

Coca-Cola
Poster
24 x 36 in
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Coca-Cola Part of Every Day

Coca-Cola Part of Every Day
Tin Sign
12 x 16 in
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Mountain Dew Soda Sold Here

Mountain Dew Soda Sold Here
Tin Sign
12 x 17 in
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Coca- Cola

Coca- Cola
Tin Sign
12 x 12 in
Your Price: $12.99 $9.99
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Pepsi Cola Classic 1970 Logo

Pepsi Cola Classic 1970 Logo
Tin Sign
11 x 17 in
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Coca-Cola - Coke Classic

Coca-Cola - Coke Classic
T-Shirt
0 x 0 in
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Coke - Good with Food

Coke - Good with Food
Tin Sign
12 x 16 in
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Coke Tin Sign

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